Dubbing

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Dubbing

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  1. Hareline Ice Dub
    $2.99
  2. Hareline UV Ice Dub
    $2.99
  3. Senyo's Laser Dub
    Special Price $2.49 - $2.99 was $2.99
  4. Hareline Super Fine Dry Fly Dubbing
    $2.69 - $2.99
  5. Spirit River Antron Dubbing
    Special Price $1.99 - $2.49 was $2.49
  6. Hareline Rainbow Scud Dub
    $2.99
  7. Hareline Dubbin
    Special Price $1.99 - $2.99 was $2.99
  8. Spirit River Lite-Brite Dubbing
    Special Price $2.79 - $3.99 was $3.99
  9. Fly Fish Food's Bruiser Blend Dubbing
    Special Price $2.49 - $2.99 was $2.99
  10. Fly Fish Food's Jr. Bruiser Blend Dubbing
    Special Price $2.49 - $2.99 was $2.99
  11. Hareline Ripple Ice Dub
    $2.79 - $3.29
  12. Hareline Hare-Tron Dubbing
    Special Price $1.99 - $2.99 was $2.99
  13. Senyo's Laser Hair Dubbing
    Special Price $1.49 - $2.39 was $2.39
  14. Cohen's Carp Dub
    Special Price $2.49 - $2.99 was $2.99
  15. Hareline Hare'E Ice Dub
    Special Price $1.99 - $2.99 was $2.99
  16. Hareline STS Trilobal Dubbing
    Special Price $1.99 - $2.99 was $2.99
  17. Spirit River UV2 Seal X Ice Dubbing
    Special Price $2.49 - $2.99 was $2.99
  18. Hareline Hare'E Wiggle Dub
    $2.99 - $18.99
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Have you ever wondered why professional fly tyers use dubbing when tying a fly? If so, you're not alone. Many aspiring fly fishers and fly tyers alike are often perplexed as to why this particular technique is used so frequently. In this article, we'll discuss what dubbing is, how to use it when tying a fly, and the different types of dubbing that are available. By the end of this post, you'll have a better understanding of why dubbing is such an important part of fly tying.


What is Dubbing?

Dubbing is a process of adding material to the shank of a hook in order to provide bulk, segmentation, or both. The material that is used in dubbing is typically fur or feathers, although other materials can be used as well. The most common type of dubbing used in fly tying is rabbit fur, although there are many other types of dubbing available on the market today.

How to Use Dubbing

There are many different ways to use dubbing when tying a fly, but the most common method is known as the "wrap method." To do this, simply take a small amount of dubbing material and wrap it around the shank of the hook. Start at the bend of the hook and work your way up towards the eye. It's important to leave some space behind the eye so that you can tie in your hackle later on. Once you've reached the desired length, simply whip finish and cut off any excess material.

Different Types of Dubbing

As we mentioned earlier, there are many different types of dubbing available on the market today. Each type of dubbing has its own unique properties that make it suited for different fishing conditions. For example, deer hair dubbing is often used for dry flies because it provides excellent floatation properties. On the other hand, rabbit fur dubbing works well for nymphs and streamers because it provides extra bulk and realism. Below are some of the most popular types of dubbing available:

Rabbit Fur Dubbing: Rabbit fur is one of the most popular types of dubbing used in fly tying today. It's often used for nymphs and streamers because it provides extra bulk and movement in the water.

Deer Hair Dubbing: Deer hair dubbing is popular among dry fly tiers because it provides excellent floatation properties. However, it can be difficult to work with if you're not familiar with using deer hair in your flies.

Synthetic Dubbing: Synthetic dubbings are made from man-made materials such as nylon or polyester. They're often used as an alternative to natural fur or feathers because they're easier to obtain and generally more consistent in quality. Plus, they come in a wide variety of colors that can be matched to nearly any fishing situation.


Dubbing is an important part of fly tying that should not be overlooked. It's a simple yet effective way to add bulk, segmentation, or both to your flies. There are many different types of dubbing available on the market today, so you should experiment with different materials until you find one that you're comfortable with using. With a little practice, you'll be able to tie flies that are more effective and realistic than ever before!