fly rod reviews

  1. Sage X Spey Rod Review

    Sage X Spey Rod Review
    Sage has re-worked their flagship series, the Sage ONE, into a more moderate action, caster-friendly rod, the Sage X. Sage designed the X for the every-man trout angler. The X is a departure from the Sage norm of fast-action rods and caters to a wider audience than rods like the Sage Igniter or the Sage ONE. The Sage X two-handed series, or the Spey series, follows the design of the one-handed Sage X rods with some significant departures. Read on to find out how the Sage X Spey Series provides industry-leading power and castability.
  2. Hardy Demon Smuggler Fly Rod Review

    Hardy Demon Smuggler Fly Rod Review
    Hardy has made a rod for the frequent traveler, a rod that fits in your back pocket. Well, almost. The new Demon Smuggler 6-piece fly rod from Hardy is made for carry-on luggage and extreme packability. Usually, a 6-piece fly rod means extra weight, less power, and decreased accuracy. This Demon Smuggler is quite the opposite, however. We are thoroughly impressed with the performance of the Demon Smuggler, especially in the 6-piece fly rod category. Read on to find out why.
  3. Douglas Upstream Fly Rod Review

    Douglas Upstream Fly Rod Review
    Are you thinking about fishing a spring creek or a backyard brook this season? The Douglas Upstream is for you. Douglas has come out with a graphite, full flex rod with a cane feel, perfect for small stream fishing. The Upstream allows anglers to slow down, make impeccable delicate presentations, and enjoy the artwork of fly fishing. This rod combines old-fashioned feel with state-of-the-art graphite technology to create a fly rod that may just be the best graphite rod we’ve ever cast at close distances. Read on to find out what makes the Upstream so much fun to fish.
  4. Thomas & Thomas Avantt Fly Rod Review

    Thomas & Thomas Avantt Fly Rod Review
    T&T’s tradition goes way back to bamboo rods and old-fashioned rod makers including the famous Thomas Dorsey and Thomas Maxwell. Is T&T old-fashioned? Quite the opposite, actually. T&T is caught up with the modern fly rod movement and produces some of the most high-tech, cutting-edge fly rods in the industry. One such example is the new freshwater Avantt rod series by Thomas & Thomas. Read on to learn how the Avantt combines classic T&T tradition and state-of-the-art contemporary innovation.
  5. Douglas DXF Fly Rod Review

    Douglas DXF Fly Rod Review
    Douglas Outdoors, founded by Jim Murphy, combines years of rod-making experience and expertise with incredible state-of-the-art technology to produce affordable fly rods. One such rod is the Douglas DXF. The DXF is a new, mid-priced rod series from Douglas that exemplifies quality and affordability. The DXF combines a fast-action rod blank with classic Douglas componentry to provide a high-quality mid-priced rod. Read on to find out more about the DXF.
  6. Fenwick AETOS Fly Rod Review

    Fenwick AETOS Fly Rod Review
    Fenwick Fly Rods are steeped in tradition dating back to fiberglass rods in the 1950s. Perhaps your father or grandfather fished a Fenwick fiberglass rod in the middle part of the 20th century. Fenwick turned to graphite like many other rod companies in the 1970s and have continued crafting top-notch rods since. One such rod is the Fenwick AETOS, a low-priced rod built for functionality and purpose. Does the AETOS pay homage to the Fenwick tradition while continuing to drive contemporary fly rod innovation? We think so. Read on to find out why.
  7. Loop Cross S1 MC/MF Fly Rod Review

    Loop Cross S1 MC/MF Fly Rod Review
    Maybe you’ve heard of the Loop brand, maybe you haven’t. Loop is a huge tackle company that dominates mostly European markets. Their presence is becoming more and more popular in the U.S., and their new fly rod, the Cross S1, is a large reason why. This rod comes in two different rod actions. We cast the MC/MF version (Mid Curve/ Medium Fast) and enjoyed it a lot. This is a phenomenal trout rod from Loop and we’re very excited about it. Read on to find out why.
  8. Redington Vice Fly Rod Review

    Redington Vice Fly Rod Review
    Redington has come out with a ‘transitional fly rod’; the Redington Vice is a fly rod you go to when fly fishing starts to become a lifestyle and not just a hobby. Appropriately named, the Vice leads anglers away from casual engagement and toward fly fishing addiction. Redington combines a fast-action blank with classic componentry to present an affordable, do-it-all fly rod series. We cast this rod at ICast and we’re pretty excited about it. Read on to find out why.
  9. Winston Pure Fly Rod Review

    Winston Pure Fly Rod Review
    The new Winston Pure light line series is marketed as a rod for anglers who prefer to fish with a light touch. The Pure enters the fly rod market at a time when many anglers prefer fast action rods with tons of power. This graphite rod series from Winston is designed to slow things down on the water and refocus an angler’s attention on presentation and slow action performance. While the Pure does its job well, it has some surprising unmarketed abilities, too. Read on to find out why we were pleasantly impressed with the new series from Winston.
  10. Mystic Reaper X Fly Rod Review

    Mystic Reaper X Fly Rod Review
    Familiar with the Mystic Reaper? Well, it has been replaced by the Reaper X, a lighter, improved, and slightly faster version of Mystic’s do-it-all freshwater Reaper. The Mystic Reaper X is yet another solid mid-priced rod option and continues the Mystic tradition of value-packed fly rods. Halloween is right around the corner, after all, and while the Reaper X may not win a prize for best costume, it may be one of the best at its price-point at tricking and treating your freshwater prey. Read more to find out why.

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