How To

  1. How to Tie the White Moth Dry Fly

    How to Tie the White Moth Dry Fly
    I don’t know much about the history of this fly. It shows up in the book Hatches and Fly patterns of the Great Smokey Mountains by Don Kirk. The pattern is about 75 years old and came out of western North Carolina. This is great pattern that is easy to see and floats well. During the summer months there seems to be no shortage of small moths flying around the streams and ponds I fish.
  2. How to Tie the Royal Wulff Attractor Fly

    How to Tie the Royal Wulff Attractor Fly
    This fly was designed by the legendary Lee Wulff as an attractor dry fly in the early 1930's. It's extremely effective, floats very well and is a great fly for fast water. A few of these in various sizes are always in my dry fly box.
  3. How to Tie the Metal Detector 2.0 Fly Pattern

    How to Tie the Metal Detector 2.0 Fly Pattern
    The Metal Detector 2.0 is the fly you need to find chrome. Designed as a summer steelhead fly it makes a great base pattern to modify to your needs. Shank or cut hook
  4. How to Tie the Sound Searcher Fly

    How to Tie the Sound Searcher Fly
    The Sound Searcher is a very cool upgrade to the classic gurgler. It makes a great searching pattern for sea trout and also a super effective wounded bait imitation
  5. How to Tie the Madam X Fly Pattern

    How to Tie the Madam X Fly Pattern
    A versatile attractor dry fly that can imitate a variety of insects- A grasshopper in larger sizes or maybe a golden stone fly in smaller sizes, the Madam X is a proven classic. The Madam X sits higher in the water column, and its buoyant nature makes it an excellent pattern to drop a nymph off.
  6. How to Tie the Sucker Spawn Fly Pattern

    How to Tie the Sucker Spawn Fly Pattern
    The Sucker Spawn is a quick-to-tie, effective pattern that requires a few sparse ingredients. Incredibly effective during the sucker spawn when trout are gorging on sucker eggs, the Sucker Spawn also acts as a general attractor that successfully imitates a cluster of eggs. We’re tying it with red thread and chartreuse Mcflyfoam, but alter the color, size, and weight to best suit your local environment.
  7. How to Tie the Black Gnat Dry Fly

    How to Tie the Black Gnat Dry Fly
    Black gnats and midges are prolific on most streams and play a significant part in a trout’s diet. As David Klausemeyer, Editor-In-Chief of Fly Tyer Magazine, matter-of-factly points out, “Show me a piece of trout water that does not have its share of little black insects fluttering across its surface, and I’ll show you a stream not worth fishing.” Several versions of this fly are out there, but this is our favorite. Follow along as Karl gives step-by-step instructions on how to tie the Black Gnat pattern.
  8. How to Tie The Bumblebee Fly Pattern

    How to Tie The Bumblebee Fly Pattern
    Bees are one of those terrestrials that are just about everywhere, and while they may not have the popularity of ants, hoppers, and beetles, there are days when catching fish relies on matching them. This Bumblebee Fly does an excellent job at imitating all species of bees, and whether you're chasing trout or panfish, this fly is an excellent choice. Made with durable floating foam, this fly rides high and makes a great choice when fishing a dry-dropper rig. Carry it in your box spring through fall, and you'll be shocked at how often this fly gets sucked down.
  9. How to Tie the Full-Dressed Clouser Minnow Fly Pattern

    How to Tie the Full-Dressed Clouser Minnow Fly Pattern
    Taking a strong influence from the classic Clouser Minnow, this Full-Dressed version offers a little bit more realism and a whole lot more movement. Maintaining that classic minnow profile, you can use this fly to match things like silversides, juvenile herring, sandeels, or just use it as a general attractor, as its ostrich herl wing adds movement whether your fly is resting on the bottom or getting stripped back to you. A solid choice in both fresh and saltwater situations that can be tied in any color scheme you like, it's hard to go wrong with this version of a must-have streamer.
  10. How to Tie The Standard Clouser Minnow Fly Pattern

    How to Tie The Standard Clouser Minnow Fly Pattern
    The Clouser Minnow is one of the most effective streamers ever designed. The Clouser was initially created by Bob Clouser for catching smallmouth bass on the Susquehanna River in the year 1987, but since then, it's become a staple for pretty much every species of fish that eats other fish. The Clouser has a deadly jigging action and rides hook point up, and you can use it to imitate a wide range of baitfish.

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