How To

  1. How to Tie the Clouser Half & Half Fly

    How to Tie the Clouser Half & Half Fly
    The Clouser Half & Half is a pattern that imitates baitfish with added flare. We've tied the Clouser Minnow in the past, but this pattern is tied with a twist. Great for freshwater Bass, Striped Bass, and just about any fish that'll eat a baitfish. The Clouser is most well-known as a saltwater pattern but works well in all situations. Watch Jared tie the Clouser Half & Half with step-by-step instructions and techniques explained.
  2. How to Tie Lefty's Deceiver Fly

    How to Tie Lefty's Deceiver Fly
    The Deceiver may be one of the most popular streamers for both freshwater and saltwater fish. This pattern can be tied in a multitude of colors to imitate a variety of bait. Here, Jared ties the Lefty's Deceiver in Blurple (black and purple) which is the most productive color combination for targeting fish at night. This is a great fly for Bass, Stripers, and more. Follow along for step-by-step instructions.
  3. How to Tie a Purple Haze Dry Fly

    How to Tie a Purple Haze Dry Fly
    The Purple Haze is a popular dry fly across the US and around the world. Similar to a Parachute Adams, the Purple Haze is easy to see and effective when trout are feeding on Mayflies. The Purple Haze is a great pattern for spooky fish in large water or fish that have seen an Adams too many times. This Mayfly imitation will float well, be highly visible, and create a buggy profile in the water. Follow our detailed instructions to tie this pattern with a parachute as Jared takes us through the steps needed to create this small, effective dry fly.
  4. How to Choose the Best Fly Rod for Permit

    How to Choose the Best Fly Rod for Permit
    The holy grail of saltwater fishing, the Permit, drives anglers crazy. Seriously people go insane for this fish. Permit are temperamentally snooty and senselessly selective. There are other species that are similarly difficult to catch but none as frustratingly conceited as the Permit. People spend thousands of dollars and go on more than a few trips to catch one Permit on the fly. Choosing the right fly rod helps. Read on to see which rod is best.
  5. How to Choose the Best Fly Reel for Salmon

    How to Choose the Best Fly Reel for Salmon
    Fly reels for Salmon is a broad category because of the diversity of Salmon species that populate the US, Canada, Eurasia, and beyond. King Salmon require a much different fly reel than Pink Salmon, Sockeye Salmon, Atlantic Salmon, etc. Commonalities exist across all Salmon species, however: they’re powerful, strong, and loads of fun to catch on a fly rod. Read on to find out which fly reel is the optimal Salmon-targeting tool.
  6. How to Choose the Best Fly Rod for Streamers

    How to Choose the Best Fly Rod for Streamers
    Streamer fishing has gained momentous popularity in the recent past, although not without controversy. Is a streamer a fly? Some purists say no, ‘those big bugs don’t count, dry or die’. It’s a valid assertion. Despite the pushback, however, streamer fishing is here to stay. Patterns created by pioneers like Kelly Galloup, Mike Schultz, and Blane Chocklett including the Sex Dungeon, Game Changer, and Swinging D have chiseled a culture that’s big, loud, and nasty. In a good way. Read on to find out which fly rod works best.
  7. How to Choose the Best Fly Rod for Panfish

    How to Choose the Best Fly Rod for Panfish
    Maybe you were lucky enough to grow up on a trout stream in Montana. Maybe you learned to fly fish for Stripers on the coast of New England. Or maybe you’re like the rest of us and honed your skills under Dad’s tutelage on a local pond where fish were easy to fool and novice fly anglers built confidence to last a lifetime. Targeting panfish on the fly encourages excitement and pure stress-free fun for novice and expert anglers alike. Read more to learn which fly rod is best for panfish.
  8. How to Choose the Best Fly Rod for Redfish

    How to Choose the Best Fly Rod for Redfish
    Redfish are thrilling to catch on a fly and often tail their way into shallow water to be sight fished by patient anglers. They’re fish that feed with the tide, so care and attention should be paid to tidal patterns and fish behavior during the range of tidal oscillation. Effort should also be expressed in choosing a fly rod for these heavy-shouldered predators. Most Redfish enthusiasts will hand you an 8wt and send you on your way. There are times, however, when a 7wt or a 9wt is a better tool for the job. How do you choose? Read on to find out.
  9. How to Tie a Crazy Charlie Fly

    How to Tie a Crazy Charlie Fly
    The Crazy Charlie is a classic Bonefish pattern that was developed on Andros Island in 1977 by Charlie Smith, a local Bahamian Bonefish guide. Since its inception, the Crazy Charlie has become one of the most popular Bonefish flies in the world. Jared takes us through the steps needed to tie this classic fly in our latest YouTube Fly Tying Tutorial. Read on for step-by-step instructions.
  10. How to Choose the Best Fly Rod for Small Streams

    How to Choose the Best Fly Rod for Small Streams
    Wild Brook Trout in the Northeast, native Cutthroat out West, blue lining, ditch poking, backpacking - can you find the common thread? Small stream fishing is a phenomenal way to get away from the crowds, find wild fish, and enjoy solitude in America’s most rugged wilderness. Choosing the right fly rod will help you make the most out of your time on smaller streams (hint: the best options aren’t lightning fast or known for their 100+ foot casting range). Read on to find out which fly rods are best for small water.

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