Fly Tying

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  1. How to Tie the Hemingway Caddis Variant Fly Pattern

    How to Tie the Hemingway Caddis Variant Fly Pattern

    The Hemingway Caddis is a variation of the Henryville Special developed in the 1930s. Mike Lawson created the variation for Jack Hemingway, son of the famous author Ernest Hemingway, for fishing the Henry’s Fork of the Snake River in Idaho.

  2. How to Tie the Red Fox Squirrel Nymph Fly Pattern

    How to Tie the Red Fox Squirrel Nymph Fly Pattern

    Dave Whitlock developed this fly back in the late 1960s and considers it one of his best nymph patterns. It’s a big-bodied nymph and Dave uses a blend of Red Fox Squirrel fur and a synthetic sparkle material for the dubbing giving it a unique reddish-brown appearance. The fly is typically tied in sizes 10-18.

  3. How to Tie the Flying Squirrel Nymph Fly Pattern

    How to Tie the Flying Squirrel Nymph Fly Pattern

    I believe originally tied by Tim Flagler it’s a mash up of 2 flies. The Bird’s Nest and the Red Fox Squirrel Nymph. It’s fairly easy to tie and just looks like something fish would eat. It’s typically tied in sizes 12 -18.

  4. How to Tie the Grillo's Hippie Stomper Fly Pattern

    How to Tie the Grillo's Hippie Stomper Fly Pattern

    The Hippie Stomper is the brainchild of Umpqua Signature Tyer Andrew Grillos. Andrew is one tough dude, and this fly is nearly as indestructible as the man himself. We’re tying the Hippie Stomper in tan and olive to imitate grasshoppers, but do not hesitate to switch it up to reflect better on what trout are eating in your local stream. Yellow and black to imitate bumblebee? Why not! Let your imagination just go with all the different foam colors available. This fly is pretty darn near unsinkable and perfect for dropping a Copper John off the bend.

  5. How to Tie the Ginger Quill Dry Fly

    How to Tie the Ginger Quill Dry Fly

    The Ginger Quill dry fly has been around for years and has been attributed to Alfred Ronalds of England in 1836. Traditionally a fly for warmer months and typically tied in sizes 12 -16. This recipe is from the book Flies for Trout by Stewart and Allen.

  6. How to Tie the Borcher's Special Dry Fly

    How to Tie the Borcher's Special Dry Fly

    This fly put together by Ernie Borcher of Michigan in the 1940’s or very early 1950’s is called Boucher’s Special. I’ve also seen it referred to Borcher’s Drake. It can imitate a number of the darker mayflies. The body was originally tied with Condor Quill but today Turkey is used. Tied in sizes 14-18 for the early season mayflies like the Hendrickson and sizes 10-12 for the big later season mayflies.

  7. How to Tie the Kennebago Smelt Pattern

    How to Tie the Kennebago Smelt Pattern

    This fly originated in the early 1950s by Bud Wilcox who was a Maine Game Warden and guide in the Rangeley lakes area. Originally the wing was tied with black saddle hackle feathers, but this variation uses black marabou. This is a very popular fly for landlocked Salmon in the early spring when the smelt are starting to run and is usually tied in sizes 2-8.

  8. How to Tie the Charlie Boy Hopper Pattern

    How to Tie the Charlie Boy Hopper Pattern

    An easy to tie hopper pattern designed by Charlie Craven and named after his son. Charlie came up with this fly about 20 years ago and it is one of my favorite hopper patterns. Floats extremely well and a great fly to run a dropper fly. With all the colors of foam available you can let your imagination run wild. Today I have chosen black to imitate the many crickets seen in the summer.

  9. How to Tie the Montreal Wet Fly

    How to Tie the Montreal Wet Fly

    If you enjoy tying and fishing old-school patterns, you’re in for a treat. And by “old school,” we actually mean it – The Montreal Wet Fly’s history dates back to the 19th century. Scotsman Peter Cowen initially tied the pattern shortly after immigrating to eastern Canada in the 1830s, and by mid-century, was one of the hottest commercially tied flies. This recipe is from Ray Bergman’s classic Trout, first published in 1938. These work well in sizes ranging from #6 to #12, so be sure to have a variety tied up.

  10. How to Tie the Grannom Caddis Dry Fly

    How to Tie the Grannom Caddis Dry Fly

    The Grannom Caddis are one of the early caddis hatches here in the East. It’s simple to tie and a lot of fun to fish during the hatch. This is the female version. If you wish to tie the male version just omit the green tag which represents the egg sack.

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