Fly Tying

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  1. How to Tie the Rear Floating Squid Fly

    How to Tie the Rear Floating Squid Fly
    They don’t call striped bass “squid hounds” for nothin’, and Bob Popovic’s Rear Floating Squid is a must have anytime calamari is on the menu. Designed so that the body sits just under the surface, while a buoyant head pushes water and creates an irresistible bubble trail every time you strip it. Whether you’re after tuna chowing down in squid in blue water, yellowtails In the pacific, or angry bluefish in New England, this is a fly that you can take anywhere. Tie it in whatever color you like, the Rear Floating Squid should have a place in every one of your salt boxes.
  2. How to Tie the Iron Lotus Fly Pattern

    How to Tie the Iron Lotus Fly Pattern
    The Iron Lotus is a mayfly nymph imitation that quickly sinks thanks to a smooth-coated layer of Solarez Bone Dry, tungsten bead, and lead wire. The Iron Lotus’ sleek silhouette and segmented body create a natural-looking mayfly nymph, and the red hotspot provides just enough flash and color contrast to grab a trout’s attention.
  3. How to Tie Bob Pop's Sand Flea Pattern

    How to Tie Bob Pop's Sand Flea Pattern
    Designed by Bob Popovics, the Sand Flea has natural motion, a realistic profile, and is incredibly effective anywhere you find sand fleas. Whether you are chasing striped bass in the Atlantic surf, corbina in the Pacific, or pompano in Florida’s wash, this fly does an excellent job at matching these crustaceans.
  4. How to Tie the Yellow Humpy Dry Fly

    How to Tie the Yellow Humpy Dry Fly
    The Yellow Humpy is a classic attractor dry fly initially tied by Jack Horner in the 40s. He needed a fly that would sit high and dry in the fast-moving streams he frequented in northern California. Word on the pattern’s attributes spread fast, Horner’s Humpy quickly made its way to the Yellowstone region, and the rest is history. The Yellow Humpy is a time-tested pattern that has filled up dry fly boxes worldwide. The deer hair and heavy hackles give the fly buoyancy, so don’t be afraid to run a dropper nymph off its bend. Trust us, this fly floats! Follow along as Karl provides a step-by-step breakdown of how to tie the Yellow Humpy!
  5. How to Tie The Hendrickson Dry Fly

    How to Tie The Hendrickson Dry Fly
    The Hendrickson dry fly was first tied in 1916 by Roy Steenrod for a friend named Albert Hendrickson for fishing the Beaverkill River’s famed spring mayfly hatch. The Ephemerella subvaria mayfly and the Hendrickson dry fly eventually became synonymous, and anglers now refer to the insect by the pattern’s name. You do not have to be in the Catskills in May to fish the Hendrickson dry fly; the pattern fishes well as a general attractor in faster pocket water, thanks to a design that allows the fly to sit higher in the water column. Follow along as Karl gives step-by-step instructions on tying this essential Catskill-style dry fly.
  6. How to Tie the Golden Retriever Fly Pattern

    How to Tie the Golden Retriever Fly Pattern
    The Golden Retriever originated in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley in the ’90s. Since then, it has become so popular here in Maine that many anglers associate the fly with the state. Brook trout, smallies, and land-lock salmon all find it irresistible. Once more, the pattern can be fished in various ways: Swinging, stripping, or dead drifting, the Golden Retriever will put fish in the net. Jim Finn initially tied the Golden Retriever on a 3X long streamer hook, but today we will be tying it on a jig-style nymph hook with a tungsten bead.
  7. How to Tie The Zoo Cougar Fly Pattern

    How to Tie The Zoo Cougar Fly Pattern
    .The Zoo Cougar is a classic sculpin imitation from the mind of legendary streamer junkie Kelly Galloup. The Zoo Cougar pushes a ton of water and is designed to entice big strikes from predatorial brown trout. The Zoo Cougar is tied without weights, so it is best to fish it on a sinking line. Get that strip set ready, and prepare to hold on tight!
  8. How To Tie Mike's Midge Pupa Fly Pattern

    How To Tie Mike's Midge Pupa Fly Pattern
    Mike Heck first tied Mike’s Midge Pupa for ultra-selective fish on technical spring creeks in Pennsylvania, where fish routinely feed on midges right below the surface film. The fly benefits from a thoughtful design where the abdomen hangs vertically in the water, similar to how a midge pupa drifts downstream. Mike’s Midge Pupa uses simple materials and is quick to tie. Whip a few of these up for when you notice fish feeding at or near the surface, but traditional dry flies are getting refused.
  9. How To Tie The Flex Fleye Fly Pattern

    How To Tie The Flex Fleye Fly Pattern
    The Flex Fleye is an awesomely simple fly designed by New Jersey’s own Bob Popovic. The fly utilizes UV Flex which gives the fly incredibly realistic movement that predatory fish find hard to resist. You can tie this up in various colors to match the baitfish in your area, but we’re tying a mackerel imitation in anticipation of striper season here in Maine.
  10. How To Tie The Ray Charles Fly

    How To Tie The Ray Charles Fly
    The Ray Charles fly is an essential pattern for the Bighorn River, other western tailwaters, as well as limestone spring creeks in Pennsylvania. It imitates a small scud or sowbug and is easy to tie up. Another bonus is that it requires only a few key ingredients. To top it off, the Ray Charles fly is easy to fish. Legend has it that even the visually impaired have caught fish with the Ray Charles pattern!

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