Fly Tying

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  1. How to Tie The Bumblebee Fly Pattern

    How to Tie The Bumblebee Fly Pattern
    Bees are one of those terrestrials that are just about everywhere, and while they may not have the popularity of ants, hoppers, and beetles, there are days when catching fish relies on matching them. This Bumblebee Fly does an excellent job at imitating all species of bees, and whether you're chasing trout or panfish, this fly is an excellent choice. Made with durable floating foam, this fly rides high and makes a great choice when fishing a dry-dropper rig. Carry it in your box spring through fall, and you'll be shocked at how often this fly gets sucked down.
  2. How to Tie the Full-Dressed Clouser Minnow Fly Pattern

    How to Tie the Full-Dressed Clouser Minnow Fly Pattern
    Taking a strong influence from the classic Clouser Minnow, this Full-Dressed version offers a little bit more realism and a whole lot more movement. Maintaining that classic minnow profile, you can use this fly to match things like silversides, juvenile herring, sandeels, or just use it as a general attractor, as its ostrich herl wing adds movement whether your fly is resting on the bottom or getting stripped back to you. A solid choice in both fresh and saltwater situations that can be tied in any color scheme you like, it's hard to go wrong with this version of a must-have streamer.
  3. How to Tie The Standard Clouser Minnow Fly Pattern

    How to Tie The Standard Clouser Minnow Fly Pattern
    The Clouser Minnow is one of the most effective streamers ever designed. The Clouser was initially created by Bob Clouser for catching smallmouth bass on the Susquehanna River in the year 1987, but since then, it's become a staple for pretty much every species of fish that eats other fish. The Clouser has a deadly jigging action and rides hook point up, and you can use it to imitate a wide range of baitfish.
  4. How to Tie the Synthetic Clouser Minnow Fly Pattern

    How to Tie the Synthetic Clouser Minnow Fly Pattern
    Drawing on Bob Clouser's famous Clouser Minnow, this Synthetic version of the Clouser offers a bit more translucency while being considerably more durable. With a flexible spine, this fly won't foul on you, while an SF Blend body reflects light, offers a little different movement than bucktail, and comes in a million colors. This fly is easy to tie, and one that you can count on anytime you're blind casting into a saltwater environment, however, it's an equally great fly for catching things like bass, pickerel, and pike. Tie the Synthetic Clouser in any color scheme that you like, or get more imitative and use this fly to match baits like sand eels, spearing, or bay anchovies.
  5. How to Tie The Bead Head Wooly Bugger Fly

    How to Tie The Bead Head Wooly Bugger Fly
    When you need a little extra weight and just enough flash to turn heads, the Bead Head Wooly Bugger is the perfect choice. Very similar to the classic Wooly Bugger, this fly has a marabou tail, chenille body, and palmered hackle, but with the addition of a bead and some flash, you get a fly that has an enticing jigging motion and just enough reflectivity. Tie this fly in any color or combination of colors you can come up with, and you can rely on it for anything from trout and carp to even redfish in a salt marsh...it's tough to beat the versatility and efficacy of this pattern.
  6. How to Tie the New England Style Clouser Minnow

    How to Tie the New England Style Clouser Minnow
    Taking the ever-famous Clouser Minnow and adding a New England twist to it, this variation is an excellent pattern when you need to quickly stock a box or imitate slender-bodied baitfish. Like the original Clouser, this fly has a nice jigging motion while a bucktail wing adds natural movement.
  7. How to Tie The Glow Bug Fly

    How to Tie The Glow Bug Fly
    Whether you're hitting the local stocked trout stream or making the annual trip up to Oak Orchard and the Salmon River, the Glo Bug is a necessary fly anytime eggs are on the menu. The Glo Bug is super easy to tie and you can whip it up in almost any color or colors that you like, and with a Mcfly foam body, this fly has near neutral buoyancy for consistently clean drifts. Fish it in a two-fly rig (where it's legal) or drift it on its own, you can fish this fly with confidence anywhere you end up.
  8. How to Tie the Zulu Wet Fly Pattern

    How to Tie the Zulu Wet Fly Pattern
    While the Zulu Wet Fly’s origins are unknown, the pattern likely developed in Europe in the mid-20th century. Despite its less-than-certain history, the Zulu is known for putting fish in the net. With its dark appearance, the Zulu fishes well in stained water or in the evening, especially on the swing! However, the Zulu is versatile enough to be fished as a nymph in smaller sizes, dead-drifted under an indicator. Follow along as Karl provides step-by-step instructions on how to tie the Zulu Wet Fly.
  9. How to Tie the Haymaker Streamer Fly

    How to Tie the Haymaker Streamer Fly
    The Haymaker is a Charlie Craven-designed streamer pattern that sort of looks like a cross between a Wooly Bugger and Pat’s Rubber Legs. While Craven initially designed the Haymaker to be trailed off a larger streamer, it works equally well fished on its own. It is heavy, gets down quickly, and has a versatile silhouette that imitates a variety of prey that trout, bass, and sunfish feed on. Strip, swing, or drift it: Simply fish it!
  10. How to Tie The Crystal Meth Fly

    How to Tie The Crystal Meth Fly
    A must-have fly anytime you're targeting steelhead and salmon, the Crystal Meth is easy to tie and fish find it irresistible. With an ability to tie it in almost any color with just enough flash, the Crystal Meth does a fine job at imitating roe. Whether you're chasing trout feeding behind spawning suckers or freshly run chrome, this is a fly that should always be in your box.

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